Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

 Q.What do you consider Upstate New York?
 A.As our little map logo shows, it is pretty much all of New York State except the major metropolitan areas around and including New York City.  I lived in "The City" for almost two years a while back and if you asked a true Manhattanite that question they would usually respond "Anything above Yonkers was Upstate".
  
 Q.My ancestors were in Bronx (or Queens, or Kings, or New York City, or Long Island, etc.) what would you recommend for additional research help?
 A.First I would go to the GenWeb page for that county and start there. The best book that I know of for research methods, resources and locations in the major metropolitan New York City area is: GUZIK, Estelle M., "Genealogical Resources in New York". Buy it, read it, take it with you on your research jaunts. It is a treasure trove.
  
 Q.Do you hate New York City?
 A.No, - "I NEW YORK!" -  [City too!]  It is just that this area of study is best left to the experts that know much more than I do.
  
 Q.What do you consider to be the "best" book to own for genealogical research in New York State?
 A.It is now, and has been for as long as I can remember, "French's Gazetteer of New York" - 1860.  When I teach genealogy classes I usually tell everyone to "read it through from cover to cover twice, and then start your research".  I'm being facetious of course, but it really is very important to get that background of the Hamlets, Villages, Towns, Cities and Counties especially in a book that was written nearly 150 years ago! The beginning chapter of each county has a place where all known newspapers that would cover that place were named, dates of publication and owners.  It also gives names of the first settlers of each location and the churches, businesses, etc.  Read the "fine print".  There are golden gems in the footnotes.    Reprints are available that include an index, but if you own an original copy then you should buy the all name index that was done by Frank Place back in the 1950's.